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May 18, 2006

An Illustration for Subterranean Magazine

saganill.jpg

The Scalzi-edited edition of Subterranean Magazine is getting tantalizingly close to print, and I've been authorized to tease you with the above super-fabulous illustration by Bob Eggleton, for the Nick Sagan story "Tees and Sympathy," which is also super-fabulous, and very funny. The closer this thing gets to being done, the more excited I get about it. This magazine is going to look great. I can't wait for you all to see it.

Which brings me to the other point, which is that Subterranean publisher Bill Schafer informs me that thanks to magical advances in print technology which allow for pin-point printing accuracy (or something), the print run of this issue of the magazine will be very close to the number of issues needed for subscribers, pre-orders and in-store copies. So the best way to make sure you get your copy is to pre-order now.

< huckster >

Yes, that's right! For just $6 you'll get great stories by Allen Steele, Elizabeth Bear, Jo Walton, Charles Coleman Finlay, Toby Buckell and more than a dozen other fabulous writers, including four writers making their SF debuts, because we believe in keeping the dream alive, yo. Plus awesome illustrations by Bob Eggleton, non-fiction by John Joseph Adams and Teresa Nielsen Hayden, book reviews, and, uh, magnificent typography. Plus it's a historical document: The only science fiction magazine ever guest-edited by a simultaneous Best Novel Hugo and Campbell nominee (NB: This last assertion not fact-checked. But it sure sounds good). Theoretically it's possible to get a better entertainment value for your six bucks than the 20 stories and articles you'll find in this issue. However, theoretically it's possible that the sun could turn into a massive shrimp puff. But how likely is it? You see where I'm going, here. What I'm saying is that this could be the best and most important $6 you will ever spend in your entire life.

< /huckster >

Seriously, though. It's a good issue. I hope you'll check it out.

Posted by john at May 18, 2006 08:56 AM

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Comments

Bill Marcy | May 18, 2006 10:40 AM

Good Holy FSM!

I can not beleive the sacrilige of boiling the one and true Pasta God. All for a cover of a magazine.

All true Pastafarians will unite and make right this outrage!

Josh Jasper | May 18, 2006 10:48 AM

Mmmm. Shrimp puff.

John Scalzi | May 18, 2006 10:48 AM

Yes, yes! The Flying Spaghetti Monster meets the fate of all false idols! In sauce!

Dr. Phil | May 18, 2006 11:00 AM

Plus it's a historical document: The only science fiction magazine ever guest-edited by a simultaneous Best Novel Hugo and Campbell nominee (NB: This last assertion not fact-checked. But it sure sounds good)

I think you've got this publicist thing nailed down, except for that honesty bit inside the parens. I mean, if you're fluffing something, why let something like facts enter into the discussion? (grin)

Dr. Phil

John Scalzi | May 18, 2006 11:03 AM

Well, chicks dig the fake humility.

Dennis | May 18, 2006 11:08 AM

I'd like to see the math behind the "massive shrimp puff" theory. Has it been published in any peer-reviewed journals? Or at least in the "Journal of Intelligent Design?" :)

P J Evans | May 18, 2006 12:19 PM

Someone is fixing crottled greeps without a fume hood?

Tripp | May 18, 2006 02:48 PM

That is one creepy picture.

Kevin Q | May 18, 2006 03:19 PM

That picture reminds me of the one time in my life I boiled a lobster at home. He stared up at me with those beady little puppy-dog eyes, and when I plunged him into the boiling water, it sounded like he'd grown about 10 new legs, and they were all scrambling on the side of the pot.

I don't think I could ever thrust another living thing into boiling water after that.

And that's why I turned down working for the CIA.

K

Smurf | May 18, 2006 05:28 PM

While I've never cooked an octopus personally, I've been in a kitchen where one was cooking.

Matt D | May 19, 2006 04:59 AM

I was just posting how cool I thought the pic was on Nick Sagan's blog, but I hadn't yet made the FSM connection. Now I feel all icky that my deity has been boiled.

mealworm | May 19, 2006 08:08 AM

Actually, isn't that the perfect analogue of the crucifixion?

John Scalzi | May 19, 2006 08:56 AM

Only if Pastafarians start walking around with little spaghetti pots around their necks.

Tripp | May 19, 2006 10:34 AM

K,

I don't think I could ever thrust another living thing into boiling water after that.

Yeah, me too, although in my darkest moments the past few years a few candidates have come to mind.

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