« Mr. Nice Guy | Main | Book is Here; Oscar Wrap-Up »

March 10, 2003

Music Plug; HTML Editor Update

A couple of random notes, which may or may not be of interest to you.

* My pal Joe Rybicki has a band called Johnny High Ground, and he's written a tune that's well likely to become the rock anthem for the "no war" crowd, called "Trigger-Happy Texan." You can guess who it's about. Putting on my music critic hat, I think it's both tuneful and thoughtful, and doesn't let its message get in the way of being a song you'd want to listen to. So I recommend it to everyone, even if you're under the impression Bush actually knows he's doing (or, alternately, if you think Bush hasn't a clue what he's doing, but don't mind popping Saddam).

It's here -- scroll down to the bottom of the page for the streaming audio (there's a hi-fi and lo-fi version).Then hop up and down and make your own mosh pit right there at work. Your boss will love you!

* A couple of weeks ago, I declared the end of my use of Microsoft products, when/if there was a viable alternative product -- the cause for this being a ham-handed maneuver by MS to block me from using my copy of Front Page 2000 (it wasn't personal; they'd block anyone in my position apparently). The sort-of boycott is still in effect, although it's not without its difficulties. For example, the simple matter of finding a viable alternative HTML editor has been something of a headache.

The fact is that I don't need a particularly sophisticated editor -- the code on this site is kept intentionally clean and minimal, because I'm not the sort of person to geek out for hours on it, and because on occasion I like to change the look of the site. Front Page was in fact much more editor than I needed (I got it specifically for its ease in putting in headers, so I wouldn't have to create a new one for every Web page I created).

This means that it doesn't make much sense for me to spend hundreds of bucks to shell out for another massively full-featured Web design product, of whose features I will end up not using 99%. But the flip side problem of this is that most really basic WYSIWYG editors are kind of crappy and kludgy -- really no fun to work in.

This was surprisingly the case with Mozilla's built-in HTML editor, which is, sad to say, truly poorly designed. For example, Mozilla's html editor doesn't let you select something as simple as a font, and that's just really stupid (alternately, it may, but the point of fact is you can't do it easily, with a drop down menu or whatever. If a feature is not immediately obvious, one can argue it's not really a useful feature). For another, it doesn't have a spellcheck. I may write for a living, but my spelling stinks, and I'd prefer not to make that any more obvious than I have to.

My immediate solution is to go back to an HTML editor I know has the features I want without the headaches I don't -- the "Composer" feature on the Netscape 4.6 client. I think it's a little sad that I have to reach back three years to find a suitable HTML editor, but I don't know if it's sad because there's no decent basic WYSIWYG html editor available today, or because I'm so pathetic in my Web design that I have to use a clunky old editor in order to feel comfortable.

Some people have suggested that I get with the 21st century and use one of the Blog generators, such as Blogger or Moveable Type, but I'm fairly unmoved by the ones I've seen. As I understand them, both those (and other similar products/services) would route my content through an unrelated site in order to be updated, and that's never any good. Also, I've used the Movable Type interface for Blogcritics, and I just don't like it. That's the problem with being picky. The benefit of doing that stuff is then I could take advantage of the latest stuff like RSS and XML and blah blah blah, but as you can guess I pretty much fundamentally don't give a crap about anything like that. People find the site just fine, even with basic HTML.

Fact is, I just want something I can type into, upload, and then forget about. The whole point of doing this stuff is that it's easy to do. If it's not, then why bother?

Posted by john at March 10, 2003 05:00 PM